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Dental Crown

At Smile Up Dental Clinic, Yangon, Myanmar, Dental crown is the another way to restoring your teeth, giving the strength and natural appearance so that you can eat, speak and smile without feeling insecure.Dental crown is placed over the damaged tooth, protect it from unwanted further damage or fracture. They are made with very strong high quality materials to withstand the biting forces and also aesthetically very pleasing due to color matching with the surrounding natural tooth.

Dental Crown

A crown, sometimes known as dental cap, is a type of dental restoration which completely caps or encircles a tooth or dental implant. Crowns are often needed when a large cavity threatens the ongoing health of a tooth. They are typically bonded to the tooth using a dental cement. Crowns can be made from many materials, which are usually fabricated using indirect methods. Crowns are often used to improve the strength or appearance of teeth. While inarguably beneficial to dental health, the procedure and materials can be relatively expensive. The most common method of crowning a tooth involves using a dental impression of a prepared tooth by a dentist to fabricate the crown outside of the mouth. The crown can then be inserted at a subsequent dental appointment. Using this indirect method of tooth restoration allows use of strong restorative materials requiring time-consuming fabrication methods requiring intense heat, such as casting metal or firing porcelain which would not be possible to complete inside the mouth. Because of the expansion properties, the relatively similar material costs, and the cosmetic benefit, many patients choose to have their crown fabricated with gold.

Types

Dental Crown

There are many different types of temporary crowns available. There also exist several ways to classify crowns. One way is to classify temporary crowns by the predicted or planned length of temporisation. Temporary crowns can be described as short-term, if used for a few days, medium-term, if their planned use for several weeks and long-term if their planned use is for several months. The choice in length of temporisation often relates to the complexity of restorative work planned. Short-term temporary crowns are generally appropriate for simple restorative cases whilst complex cases involving more that one tooth often require long-term temporary crowns. Temporary crowns can also be described by the way they are manufactured or fitted on the crown preparation. Temporary crowns can either be direct, if constructed by the dentist in the clinic, or indirect if they are made off-site, usually in a dental laboratory. Generally direct temporary crowns tend to be for short-term use. Where medium-term or long-term temporisation is required, the use of indirect temporary crowns should be considered.

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